Thursday, August 14, 2014

Hot Weather Safety


Welcome to 

Hot Weather Safety
with
The Idaho Pugs


Every buddy loves the summer time. Summer brings lots of fun activities, like walking and hiking and swimming. Butt  - summer time also brings HEAT and heat can be very dangerous to your pet, they can easily suffer from heat exposure.

Hot weather is especially tough on brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds like pugs. Because of their short noses and smaller air passages, pugs can’t adequately cool air or release heat when they are in hot temperatures.  Take extra caution with your pug whenever they are in an environment with temperatures exceeding 75 degrees. Brachycephalic  dogs have the highest risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke

Brachycephalic dogs are the cute, personable breeds such as Bulldogs, Pugs, Pekingese and Boston Terriers. Their short noses and flat faces are at an extreme disadvantage in hotter temperatures because the dog’s primary mechanism for beating the heat is panting, and these dogs do not pant efficiently.

You can see how Flat my nose is!

Panting is a form of evaporative cooling, and air must easily flow for the process to work. The shorter faces of brachycephalic dogs make them look adorable, but they create big problems for airflow. These dogs suffer from brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS), which causes inefficient breathing and, therefore, inefficient cooling.

The mouth could do all the work, except brachycephalic dogs have long, soft palates in the back of their mouths. The palate tissue blocks the flow of air to the trachea. And lastly, many have small, hypoplastic tracheas in which the diameter of the trachea is greatly reduced.
Each of these structural problems interferes with how quickly air can pass to the lungs. Air movement for a brachycephalic dog might be the equivalent of a person who is trying to breathe with swollen tonsils and a clothespin on his nose.

If evaporation is the way a system cools, and little air is passing through, the system quickly overheats. Dogs can easily suffer from heat exposure, but brachycephalic dogs have the highest risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
Owners of brachycephalic dogs can help their dogs breathe easier and stay cooler through elective surgery. Nares can be made wider, the soft palate can be shortened.

BUTT - ANY PET CAN BE AT RISK FOR HEAT EXPOSURE

Heat stroke (hyperthermia)
If your pet is exposed to hot temperatures and you suspect heat stroke, act immediately.  Heat stroke is an EMERGENCY since it can be fatal in as little as ten minutes.  Here are signs of heat stroke any pet owner must be aware of:

  • Frantic, rapid panting
  • Bright red tongue and  red or pale gums
  • Thick or sticky saliva
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Shock

If you suspect your pet is experiencing heat stroke, it is a life threatening emergency and you need to call your veterinarian right away! Immediately get your pet out of the heat and into an air-conditioned area and take their rectal temperature if possible- it will exceed 103°F with heat stroke.  Offer your pet small amounts of cool water if they are not vomiting and are able to drink.  Spray them with cool (not cold) water, especially on their head, neck, feet, chest, and belly as well as turning on a fan and point it in their direction.  You can spray their paw pads, under their armpits, and groin area with isopropyl alcohol.  Do NOT immerse your pet in ice or in ice-cold water.  The goal is to decrease the body temperature normal in the first 10-15 minutes but then the cooling process needs to be slowed and monitored by your veterinarian as their temperature can drop dangerously low.

Thank you Barking from the Bayou and PetPlan for the cool graphics



Here are some tips to Stay Cool in the Heat


Protect your pet from the heat. 

Provide plenty of shade, air-conditioning, and a cool pool of water to help your pet escape the heat.

Make sure your pet always has plenty of fresh, cool water every day in a bowl that won’t tip over.

If you are headed outdoors with your pet, be sure to bring along cool water and a portable bowl for them to drink from.  Anytime your pet is outside, make sure they have protection from the heat and sun.  Tarps and tree shaded areas are ideal as they won’t obstruct air flow. A dog house won’t provide relief from the heat and could actually make it worse for your pet.


Exercise your pet in the early morning or late evening hours when it’s a little cooler.

Make sure to adjust the time and intensity of exercise based on the temperature and humidity.  Older dogs, young puppies, overweight pets, short nose breeds, pets not used to exercise, and pets with heart and respiratory problems are more likely to overheat in hot weather.  Keep in mind that the street and sidewalks as well as the sand on the beach can be very hot and can burn their pads.

Monitor your pet’s health.

Pay close attention to your pet’s respiratory rate, effort to breathe, stamina, willingness to continue and fatigue. All can be signs of possible overheating.

Respond quickly

If your pet is working hard to breathe, and if his tongue is flat and wide for maximum evaporation, don’t ignore it. Take immediate measures to cool him down 

Control your dog’s weight.

Maintaining a healthy weight can help your pet  breathe easier

Never leave your pet in a parked car, not even for a few minutes.

On a day when it is 85°F outside, a car with its windows slightly opened can heat up to over 100°F in just 10 minutes! Even on seemingly mild days, an enclosed car can be deadly. Recent studies show that when it is 72°F outside, a car’s internal temperature can climb to 116°F within one hour. It can take as little as 10 minutes for a dog to sustain organ damage or even death when trapped in these temperatures so plan your day and travel to guarantee your dog is never left in the car. 

Use sunscreen on your pets when they are outside.

Pets with light colored skin or thin fur can sunburn easily and are more prone to skin cancer. If your pet will be outside in the sun a lot then use sunblock, yes, there is sunblock for pets!  Be sure to apply it to exposed areas like the ears, nose, and even the belly for those pets who tend to lay in the sun.


Keep your pet well groomed.

While a haircut may help keep your pet cooler, cutting them too short can remove insulation against the heat and also make them more susceptible to sunburn.  Keeping them free of mats and loose undercoat with regular brushing helps their coat to “breathe”.

Make sure to use proper flea and tick prevention.

Flea and tick populations thrive in warm, humid environments, and are most prevalent in the summer months. They can pose serious health concerns such as the spread of Lyme disease, the transmission of tapeworms and cause allergy dermatitis, so it is important to use the proper flea and tick preventatives and treatments with your pets.

Watch for signs of heatstroke.


Signs include: Sudden collapse, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, drooling profusely, panting excessively or difficult breathing, rapid heart rate, glazed eyes, wobbly or uncoordinated movement, stupor or coma, bright red or purple gums and/or tongue

If you suspect your pet is experiencing heat stroke, it is a life threatening emergency and you need to call your veterinarian right away! Immediately get your pet out of the heat and into an air-conditioned area and take their rectal temperature if possible- it will exceed 103°F with heat stroke.  Offer your pet small amounts of cool water if they are not vomiting and are able to drink.  Spray them with cool (not cold) water, especially on their head, neck, feet, chest, and belly as well as turning on a fan and point it in their direction.  You can spray their paw pads, under their armpits, and groin area with isopropyl alcohol.  Do NOT immerse your pet in ice or in ice-cold water.  The goal is to decrease the body temperature normal in the first 10-15 minutes but then the cooling process needs to be slowed and monitored by your veterinarian as their temperature can drop dangerously low.




Be sure to visit the rest of today's safety hosts!









www.mkclinton.com





A HUGE thanks to Sarge & Sidebite for 
organizing Safety Week!


We are the PugRanch Kids
Bailey, Hazel & Greta

31 comments:

Reilly-Denny Cowspotdogs said...

what an excellent post - well done guys of explaining all the necessary precautions related to heat. you did a totally awesome job and we learned so much !

Ranger said...

GREAT JOB Greta, Hazel, and Mr. B. I learned a lot.
Wags,
Ranger

GOOSE said...

That was a VERY helpful and informative post. WELL done. Hope everyone paid attention so they don't become "well done".
Blessings,
Goose

Madi and Mom said...

Greta, Hazel and Bailey!!
OMPs I did not know all those facts about Pugs. THANK YOU for the wonderful information
and for all the time it took you to prepare this wonderful post.
Hugs madi your bfff

Molly The Wally said...

Great post and something over here we need to keep reminding ourselves as it has been hot and most of us don't have AC. Well done you. Have a tremendous Thursday.
Best wishes Molly

Sarge said...

Hey Bailey, Greta and Hazel!
Wow, this was a really important post for all of us! I didn't know heat stroke can happen quite so quickly. OMD these graphics you have here are super. The hot car issue cannot be stressed enough and sadly pets die too often from peeps not thinking about their hot car. Thanks so much for hosting this one and covering it so well for everyone! You are all adorable in your clown outfits! BOL
Grr and Woof,
Sarge, Police Commish

stellaroselong said...

this was one super post pugs!! Did you know my mom almost killed me the day after hers saved me, yep it was august and she was showing me off all day to everyone and I kept going in and out of the house, and I got overheated, and started to do this bobble head thing...mom panicked all the vet and they told her what to do....she did not know then all about pugs, hers is smarter now. we worry also about dogs being left in cars, it makes my mom lose sleep at night, loved your pictures!!!! (clown cost.)
stella rose

Oz theTerrier said...

Bravo! Bravo! Excellent information about Heat Safety, Pug Kids. I agree and follow a LOT of these since I live in Florida where it can be brutally hot and humid. I love the graphics too! Stay cool, my friends.
Oz

Two French Bulldogs said...

Hot weather safety is soooo important especially for flat-faced breeds
Lily & Edward

Murphy said...

This is excellent information. More peeps need to pay attention to how hot the doggie is getting. Stanley got hot the other day and tomorrow you will see what he did!

Your Pals,

Murphy & Stanley
Mayorz For All Paws

easyweimaraner said...

Many thanks for such a great post! Hope our neighbor will read it. His dog was in the car while they were in the grocery store in a group of four. I mean even one of them could wait outside with the dog instead to park this poor pooch together with the car, specially because their dog is a short-nosed guy too (Frenchie).

PugSlope.com said...

Thank you for sharing this information. We've been so lucky that this summer has been really cool in the Midwest. We've only had a few days that warranted air conditioning which is definitely unusual for here. I am not complaining, though. :)

-Love,
Sid.

Sweet William The Scot said...

Sometimes people think little dogs are safe from heat stroke but just because we might be cute and fluffy the weather effects us the same and being black I hold the heat. I am glad to get all the information I can.
Thanks for being a friend
Sweet William The Scot

Casey said...

What a grreat post! Super informative. Boxers are brachycephalic too, so Momma keeps a very close watch on us in the Texas heat.

Frankie Furter and Ernie said...

TEACHERS.... TEEEEEEEECHERS..... Over HERE... Miss Greta, Miss Hazel, Mr. Bailey.... it's ME.... ERNIE... your Student..... I'm in the FRONT ROW.... and Frankie is Behind me.... we are takin NOTES .... beclaws this is a SUPER CLASS and we want an A.
OMD you are Wonderful Teachers and we Learned so much about being SAFE from the HEAT...
THIS was fangtastic. THANK YOU SO MUCH.... it was a HOT HOT HOT... in a GOOD WAY... Class.

Bella Roxy & Macdui said...

That's interesting about you short noses. We have Long noses and we mostly hibernate in the a/c during the day. AND SHE won't take us for rides in the car much. We also have to watch out for snakes, so there are certain places where we can't walk.

Thanks for all the info. We're sure it'll start warming up here, soon.

♥♥♥ The OP Pack ♥♥♥ said...

Awesome post - lots and lots of great points and tips. It gets pretty warm here for us Northern breed dogs, but Mom is very careful about keeping us in the cool a/c and making sure we have lots of water and only walk later at night. It's been a great week of safety information.

Woos - Phantom, Ciara, and Lightning

Chef Sasha said...

Wow this great stuff to know. Thanks for this paw some information. I am not so crazy about the watching my weight and grooming part, but I do understand. My Vetlady told Mommy I have really tiny nostrils so she knows to be careful with me. I am kind of an indoor pup, but iI do love a good long walk.

Thanks for this great post and stop by the food truck for some goodies.

Love Sasha

Susie and Sidebite said...

We are printing a lot of your post off, first to hand in our pupper house for us to monitor and second for the peeps to have hanging on the refrig, we gets lots of heat here for 3 to 4 months, very good stuffs to know.

Thank gang for being a part of Safety Week

Top Cop Bites
Pees: Da Sus has something special planned for gals tomorrow, check it out!

Amber DaWeenie said...

Thank you for this impawtant information. Living in Florida really exposes us to the heat if we go outside, so we stay inside most of the summer except for potty breaks.

Whitley Westie said...

I get my walks early in da mornin in da summer cuz it are so hot here! Momma can't believe it when she sees peeps runnin wif their dogs in 100+ heat. And dey don't even bring water for dere pups, just demselves.

M. K. Clinton said...

We also have ridiculous heat and humidity during the summer. It is difficult to stay out and be active except in the morning and evening hours. All great inforamtion and I learned more about Pugs and Bulldogs which I love! Y'all stay cool and safe.

Dory and the Mama said...

What a wonderful post you guys!! We learned so much, and Arty in a snoofler, so we paid particular attention to that part of the post!

Smileys!
Dory, Jakey, Arty & Bilbo

Tweedles -- that's me said...

thank you, thank you for all this information that will help sooo many.
Wonderful tips!
love
tweedles

sprinkles said...

This was lots of impawtent informations, thanks for sharing. It's impawtent to always make sure your pets stay cool in hot weather.

Sarge said...

Hey Bailey, Hazel and Greta!
Wow, I'm making the rounds around Blogville and wanted to stop by and thank you again for hosting Hot Weather Safety for us! Your post was great and I never thought about some breeds having a harder time breathing in hot weather. OMD you are so cute in your clown outfits! Thanks again for joining in and making such a great post. You will be entered in the Host Appreciation Drawing for a cool prize. Random drawing to be held on Monday, August 18th.
Grr and Woof,
Sarge, Police Commish

Hailey and Zaphod and their Lady said...

Those are very great hints for staying cool and good explaining why it is so important. We would like to say that we have had to worry about the heat this year, but we haven't, it has been an unusually cool summer, sigh! When Lady was traveling alone with Phod and had to leave him in the car (he couldn't go in the rest stop and she wouldn't pee on a tree), she used her car starter to keep the car cool.

Awesome post!

Susan Willett said...

Great post. Lots of great ideas.

One of our dogs has long black fur, and we have to be especially careful to make sure she doesn't overheat. She's part border collie, and very smart, so she'll seek out the coolest spot in the yard, or ask to go inside when it's really hot out.

Wags (and purrs) from Life with Dogs and Cats

FiveSibesMom said...

GREAT post! Those are all very important tips! We'll be sure to share these with all of our furfriends! Stay cool and thanks for a great informative post!

Pippa Sheltie said...

Puggies, this is definitely a super duper interesting post!! Everyone needs to know this stuff, I'm glad you've highlighted it. You are all so clever! yesterday, I found another yummy way to cool down!
Have a super week,
Pippa :)

Lassiter Chase and Benjamin said...

We are so far behind reading everyone's safety week posts. We blame it all on our human! She had a back ouchie and claimed she couldn't help us read posts. (Excuses excuses!)