Monday, July 18, 2016

Summer Heat Safety with Mabel & Arty

Things are starting to heat up in the race for
Mayor of Blogville

But that is not all that is getting hot


The weather is heating up too!
(Tee hee! what were you thinking??)


Candy Date Arty wants all of Blogville
 to have a safe and enjoyable summer

So on behalf of Candy Date Arty 
we would like to share with you 
some very impawtent information about heat safety

This information was originally posted on Aug 14, 2014 as part of Blogville Safety Week


Every buddy loves the summer time. Summer brings lots of fun activities, like walking and hiking and swimming. Butt  - summer time also brings HEAT and heat can be very dangerous to your pet, they can easily suffer from heat exposure.

Hot weather is especially tough on brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds like pugs. Because of their short noses and smaller air passages, pugs can’t adequately cool air or release heat when they are in hot temperatures.  Take extra caution with your pug whenever they are in an environment with temperatures exceeding 75 degrees. Brachycephalic  dogs have the highest risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke

Brachycephalic dogs are the cute, personable breeds such as Bulldogs, Pugs, Pekingese and Boston Terriers. Their short noses and flat faces are at an extreme disadvantage in hotter temperatures because the dog’s primary mechanism for beating the heat is panting, and these dogs do not pant efficiently.

Angel Greta had a really flat nose!

Panting is a form of evaporative cooling, and air must easily flow for the process to work. The shorter faces of brachycephalic dogs make them look adorable, but they create big problems for airflow. These dogs suffer from brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS), which causes inefficient breathing and, therefore, inefficient cooling.

The mouth could do all the work, except brachycephalic dogs have long, soft palates in the back of their mouths. The palate tissue blocks the flow of air to the trachea. And lastly, many have small, hypoplastic tracheas in which the diameter of the trachea is greatly reduced.
Each of these structural problems interferes with how quickly air can pass to the lungs. Air movement for a brachycephalic dog might be the equivalent of a person who is trying to breathe with swollen tonsils and a clothespin on his nose.

If evaporation is the way a system cools, and little air is passing through, the system quickly overheats. Dogs can easily suffer from heat exposure, but brachycephalic dogs have the highest risk for heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
Owners of brachycephalic dogs can help their dogs breathe easier and stay cooler through elective surgery. Nares can be made wider, the soft palate can be shortened.

BUTT - ANY PET CAN BE AT RISK FOR HEAT EXPOSURE

Heat stroke (hyperthermia)
If your pet is exposed to hot temperatures and you suspect heat stroke, act immediately.  Heat stroke is an EMERGENCY since it can be fatal in as little as ten minutes.  Here are signs of heat stroke any pet owner must be aware of:

  • Frantic, rapid panting
  • Bright red tongue and  red or pale gums
  • Thick or sticky saliva
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Shock

If you suspect your pet is experiencing heat stroke, it is a life threatening emergency and you need to call your veterinarian right away! Immediately get your pet out of the heat and into an air-conditioned area and take their rectal temperature if possible- it will exceed 103°F with heat stroke.  Offer your pet small amounts of cool water if they are not vomiting and are able to drink.  Spray them with cool (not cold) water, especially on their head, neck, feet, chest, and belly as well as turning on a fan and point it in their direction.  You can spray their paw pads, under their armpits, and groin area with isopropyl alcohol.  Do NOT immerse your pet in ice or in ice-cold water.  The goal is to decrease the body temperature normal in the first 10-15 minutes but then the cooling process needs to be slowed and monitored by your veterinarian as their temperature can drop dangerously low.

Thank you Barking from the Bayou and PetPlan for the cool graphics



Here are some tips to Stay Cool in the Heat


Protect your pet from the heat. 

Provide plenty of shade, air-conditioning, and a cool pool of water to help your pet escape the heat.

Make sure your pet always has plenty of fresh, cool water every day in a bowl that won’t tip over.

If you are headed outdoors with your pet, be sure to bring along cool water and a portable bowl for them to drink from.  Anytime your pet is outside, make sure they have protection from the heat and sun.  Tarps and tree shaded areas are ideal as they won’t obstruct air flow. A dog house won’t provide relief from the heat and could actually make it worse for your pet.


Exercise your pet in the early morning or late evening hours when it’s a little cooler.

Make sure to adjust the time and intensity of exercise based on the temperature and humidity.  Older dogs, young puppies, overweight pets, short nose breeds, pets not used to exercise, and pets with heart and respiratory problems are more likely to overheat in hot weather.  Keep in mind that the street and sidewalks as well as the sand on the beach can be very hot and can burn their pads.

Monitor your pet’s health.

Pay close attention to your pet’s respiratory rate, effort to breathe, stamina, willingness to continue and fatigue. All can be signs of possible overheating.

Respond quickly

If your pet is working hard to breathe, and if his tongue is flat and wide for maximum evaporation, don’t ignore it. Take immediate measures to cool him down 

Control your dog’s weight.

Maintaining a healthy weight can help your pet  breathe easier

Never leave your pet in a parked car, not even for a few minutes.

On a day when it is 85°F outside, a car with its windows slightly opened can heat up to over 100°F in just 10 minutes! Even on seemingly mild days, an enclosed car can be deadly. Recent studies show that when it is 72°F outside, a car’s internal temperature can climb to 116°F within one hour. It can take as little as 10 minutes for a dog to sustain organ damage or even death when trapped in these temperatures so plan your day and travel to guarantee your dog is never left in the car. 

Use sunscreen on your pets when they are outside.

Pets with light colored skin or thin fur can sunburn easily and are more prone to skin cancer. If your pet will be outside in the sun a lot then use sunblock, yes, there is sunblock for pets!  Be sure to apply it to exposed areas like the ears, nose, and even the belly for those pets who tend to lay in the sun.


Keep your pet well groomed.

While a haircut may help keep your pet cooler, cutting them too short can remove insulation against the heat and also make them more susceptible to sunburn.  Keeping them free of mats and loose undercoat with regular brushing helps their coat to “breathe”.

Make sure to use proper flea and tick prevention.

Flea and tick populations thrive in warm, humid environments, and are most prevalent in the summer months. They can pose serious health concerns such as the spread of Lyme disease, the transmission of tapeworms and cause allergy dermatitis, so it is important to use the proper flea and tick preventatives and treatments with your pets.

Watch for signs of heatstroke.


Signs include: Sudden collapse, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, drooling profusely, panting excessively or difficult breathing, rapid heart rate, glazed eyes, wobbly or uncoordinated movement, stupor or coma, bright red or purple gums and/or tongue

If you suspect your pet is experiencing heat stroke, it is a life threatening emergency and you need to call your veterinarian right away! Immediately get your pet out of the heat and into an air-conditioned area and take their rectal temperature if possible- it will exceed 103°F with heat stroke.  Offer your pet small amounts of cool water if they are not vomiting and are able to drink.  Spray them with cool (not cold) water, especially on their head, neck, feet, chest, and belly as well as turning on a fan and point it in their direction.  You can spray their paw pads, under their armpits, and groin area with isopropyl alcohol.  Do NOT immerse your pet in ice or in ice-cold water.  The goal is to decrease the body temperature normal in the first 10-15 minutes but then the cooling process needs to be slowed and monitored by your veterinarian as their temperature can drop dangerously low.



This public service announcement is posted on behalf of the
Keep Blogville Fun Campaign






We are the PugRanch Kids
Bailey, Hazel & Mabel










27 comments:

Mark Muller said...

I agree with you... the heat can be a dangerous thing.... therefore we fortunately skipped the july-show. But I feel for my pug friends and the frenchies who have to spend a long day in that heat... we hope the owners will be resonsible and no one has to suffer just for a ribbon or a plastic trophy...

Julie said...

Great advice and very useful as we are having SUMMER here for the next 3 days...yep, the sun is shinning in the UK fur, well, 3 days!!!!
Loves and licky kisses
Princess Leah xxx

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
Oh that is interesting and impawtant reading for efurrybuddy - bravo bravo for re-posting this useful information!!! Even here in UK, we may actually get some heating up temperatures - so very timely. Hugs and wags, YAM-aunty xxx

Madi and Mom said...

Dearest Mabel and Arty....can you hear us clapping and saying what a wonderful informative post this is today. I don't go out but I actually think it applies to humans too so I'll be sure mom sees it
Hugs madi your bfff

Reilly-Denny Cowspotdogs said...

that was some excellent information and so important for everyone to know - well done

Christmas & Robin said...

Great informative post!

Dory and the Mama said...

Such great information!!! Thanks for letting me help spread the word about such an important topic!
Smileys!
Arty (Dory, Bilbo and Jakey say hi too!)

C.L.W.STEP said...

Some very good advice!

tubby3pug said...

good advice on hot days we stay in we have a baby pool but none of us like it except bob

Sheltie Times said...

Great tips. Mom keeps AC on because my coat is so thick.

Sully said...

Thanks for the tips!

Aroo to you,
Sully

stellaroselong said...

This was an excellent post, mom is always on the heat patrol wif us, I lived in ice water soaked towels on the BAR retreat...the heat snuck up on me. I loved the hotel. stella rose

Oz theTerrier said...

Thank you for reposting this! It has a lot of great information that everyone needs to remember during the Summer heat!

♥♥ The OP Pack ♥♥ said...

What an awesome AND important post you have shared today!!! WE don't go out much in the awful heat we are having. It is really bad today and today is supposed to be one of the better days this week:( One of these days maybe we will take Mom up on her offer for us to get in our little pool.

Woos - Ciara and Lightning

Two French Bulldogs said...

Good job guys. This message is of utmost importance
Lily & Edward

Casey said...

Grrreat advice! Boxers are short-nosed too, so we understand how hard it is.

Molly and Mackie said...

Excellent information!

Bella Roxy & Macdui said...

Peeps need to know the general stuff about HEAT, and the special stuff about their particular breed. We hope you have some good airconditioning at your place.

Murphy said...

A very timely post with good information!

Your Pals,

Murphy & Stanley

Hailey and Zaphod and their Lady said...

Those are some great tips. We can't believe that people keep needing to be told not to leave animals in hot cars. A Lady in the city near us was fined for it.

Sweet William The Scot said...

Heat why all those tips were really important. Lee always watches me that I don't get over heated. Thanks for a very important message.
Sweet William The Scot

M. K. Clinton said...

I'm so glad the infographs came in handy! This is such an important subject. It's crazy hot down here too.

The Daily Pip said...

Such great information in this post! We are definitely going to save it. The last few summers Pip was really at risk of heat stroke. He wore a cooling jacket when we were outside that really helped.

Foley Monster, Pocket and River Song said...

This is very important information. River is a Brachycephalic dog (a Brussels Griffon.) She does not go for walks on hot days. She is in her stroller when we are outside but always in the shade. If the temperature is close, or over, 90 then we bring her in every hour to cool down.

Tweedles -- that's me said...

Thank you for all the informations!!!
I want a pool like you have!
love
tweedles

LBJ said...

Abby won't play in her pool, but after a walk if it's warm, I take a cool towel and rub her fur and she really likes that. If it gets over 90, she goes out to the back yard on the grass for a mid day potty break and then the dog walker just plays with her in the house for her 30 minutes. She loves the break and neither of them need to be out walking when it's that hot. If I do have to take her to the vet and the pavement is warm, I put some of the ointment on her pads I use when it's snowy so she's more comfortable.

Pug Slope said...

Thank you for sharing this important information! My Dad finally put our window AC unit in to keep our apartment cool. I love your pool! It looks like so much fun!

-Love,
Sid.